Tag Archives: running costs

Lotus Elise

There’s a good word that sums up the Elise, and that word is ‘connected’. In a world where cars are more and more divorced from both driver and road, the lightweight Elise is a sportscar that still delivers the best seat-of-the-pants feel this side of a Caterham.

Comfort
Better than before, in that it now won’t actually cripple and deafen you in the first 30 miles. Just getting into the thing is a hilarious business, and once inside the ergonomics are terrible – the Elise is very focussed, so heaters and radios are added in later. Much easier entry and egress with the roof off, but it’s a pain to replace quickly if there’s a snap rain shower.

Performance
The Elise isn’t actually that shattering when it comes to out-and-out shove – it’s more to do with the purity of the driving experience. That said, it’s not slow; nowadays the Elise is powered by a Toyota 1.8 with variable valve timing that produces 134bhp in basic 1.8 S form, 189bhp as a 1.8R and 217bhp in the supercharged variant. That gives 0-62mph times that drop in a similar order; 5.8, 5.2 and 4.4, with top speeds that rise accordingly; 127mph, 147mph and 150mph.

Cool
The Elise manages to walk the fine tightrope between enthusiast’s machine and look-at-me poseur mobile, with probably a little more of the former. So it’s cool, but not as cool as an Exige.

Quality
Modern Elises feel like they could be taken to a track and abused without falling to bits, but then there’s not that much inside to break. Don’t be worried if the aluminium tub creaks and rattles a bit – there’s little sound deadening and most of the interior is bare metal. The pop-in-pop-out roof bars sometimes have dodgy seals too – but that’s not a big worry.

Handling
The Elise makes even a trip to the shops an adventure, with steering so feelsome it’s like running the palm of your hand down the tarmac itself. You can feel road cambers that you won’t have a clue about from the helm of any sports saloon, and when the car starts to reach the limits of its considerable grip, your bum will telegraph the situation to you well in advance.

Practicality
If there was a sliding scale of practicality with 1 being the worst and 10 being the best, the Elise would be somewhere around -2 with the Lamborghini Diablo SV and the TukTuk motor tricycle. There is a boot behind the engine, but it tends to cook whatever is stored there. Squashy bags are OK, but space everywhere else is at a premium. And don’t expect to arrive and be able to emerge gracefully – unless you’re 5ft tall, the Elise will strip your ego bare.

Running costs
Not a bad choice if you want a tidy driving experience and you still want to be able to use your face and heart afterwards. The engines are clean and that means 27-percent company car tax – fancy that – though insurance is high at group 20 all round. Economy is also pretty reasonable given the Elise’s performance potential – the 1.8R will get 32.1mpg and the 1.8 an even better 34mpg.

Citroen C – Crosser

The Citroen C-Crosser is the same car as the Mitsubishi Outlander and Peugeot’s 4007 – they’re identical but with different tinsel. Doesn’t make them bad though. Manufactured by Mitsubishi, they make a lot of sense.

Comfort
Firmly sprung but well damped, Citroen’s first 4×4 (ish) since the 2CV Mehari variant makes for a decent motorway companion. When things work this well and you don’t pay very much dynamically, the high driving position becomes a boon you get to like.

Performance
The 2.2-litre four-pot turbo diesel in the C-Crosser is a gem. It may only have 154bhp, but the car punts from rest to 62mph in just under 10 seconds and can overtake and ride the motorways with ease. A terminal speed of 124mph is perfectly achievable but unnecessary.

Cool
Acceptable parked on the drive, though don’t expect a C-Crosser to get you laid unless you live in a really rough town.

Quality
All the variants of this car are built by Mitsubishi, so although the C-Crosser is built with the exacting standards of the Japanese, it won’t win many design awards. Feels good inside though.

Handling
Very, very car-like, the C-Crosser has a well-judged chassis set-up that makes it genuinely fun to drive. It doesn’t get distracted by bumps and can be made to dispense quite a lot of speed on tight roads. Decent steering and strong brakes help.

Practicality
Pop-up kid’s seats in the back are a stroke of genius for families with kids and friends and kit to transport. The boot’s also big with just five to seat – it’ll hold 770litres. As an all-round car it’s hard to pick fault.

Running costs
Insurance at Group 12 feels steep, but around 40mpg is a nice surprise for an SUV, even a soft one. Not in the highest VED band for tax – but it’ll still hit you for £200 a year.

Nissan GTR

The Nissan GTR has set a new standard for sportscar production, not just because it is phenomenally fast, capable and approachable, but also because it’s not actually that expensive. Porsche, Ferrari, Aston? There’s no longer any need.

Comfort
Despite immense power and an out-and-out performance bent, the GTR is superbly comfortable and refined. It rides firmly though, and when we get to drive one in the UK we’ll know if that’s going to be a problem.

Performance
There’s 470bhp being sent to all four wheels via a semi-automatic dual clutch gearbox. This means 0-60mph in around 3.5 seconds and a top speed not far shy of 200mph. But it’s what you can do in between that sets the GTR apart.

Cool
When the first GTRs start appearing in the UK they will be rarer than gold dust and more popular than Kate Moss at a swingers’ party. Suddenly a 911 is going to be tomorrow’s chip paper, and everyone is going to be fighting over a Nissan.

Quality
The GTR is beautifully constructed, with superb detailing and fantastically solid, contemporary materials. No problems reported yet either, and none likely.

Handling
Taking Porsche’s current generation 911 Turbo as a benchmark, the GTR handles like few other cars on the planet. Four-wheel drive provides bags of traction, while steering feels steady and pin-sharp.

Practicality
There is a boot of sorts, so you could just about go away in a GTR, but that’s not the point. This is a car that’s so preposterously good that shortcomings are mere foibles, readily dismissed with a quick squeeze of throttle.

Running costs
Expect fuel consumption to bring you out in a cold sweat and insurance premiums to cause a minor coronary. But remember all the while that you could probably sell an early car for a profit.